More Good Books, recommend by Dr. Peggy Sharp.

Since I loved the first workshop I attended at EARCOS with Dr. Peggy Sharp. I went to her second workshop as well (you can never have too much of a good thing right?). During this workshop she discussed new books to use in the classroom that are appropriate for grades 3-5. After the workshop was over I honestly wanted to run straight to a bookstore, purchase all of the books, and start reading… for myself, not even for teaching and sharing them with children! Hehe, anyway… here is a link the handout/packet she had for this workshop:

Peggy Sharp, Grades 3-5

I completely forgot to mention last time that Peggy has symbols by the titles of the books in the handout.

❤ (heart)= picture book that everybody loves

@= early intermediate (grades 3-5)

%= (grades 5-8)

! = sophisticated content (maybe language, violence, etc)

(She didn’t mention what t and the * snowflake mean, so use your best guess?).

It was even more difficult to choose my top three to share really quick… but if I had to pick, these would be it!

There are absolutely fantastic tips in this book for kids who are not the biggest fans of reading (really, they are so useful!).

From the author of So B. It, oh it says that in the picture…

This was the top book I wanted to run out and purchase. I cannot wait to read it. Brian Selnick has done it again, possibly even better than Hugo…

Who doesn’t love to read? I used to get grounded from it when I was little…

chartchums

Visuals are extremely important, don’t you think? At the beginning of this year I was introduced to the site: chartchums (their most recent post is actually about an international school in Taiwan!). I love them. I don’t know who Kristi and Marjorie are, besides literacy consultants… but I wouldn’t mind being their friend.

They gave me the idea to visually keep track of my students quiet reading time. At the beginning of the year I saw this chart on their site and I immediately implemented it into my classroom:

My students couldn’t even make it two minutes! But when they saw this chart, they realized they wanted to make it to the star. Now my students can read independently for 21 minutes.

Let your students see their progress, and they will progress that much more. Thanks for the chart idea, chartchums!